Author Graeme Barber

Graeme is a professional diver, qualified as a PADI and SDI Divemaster, DCBC 40m Unrestricted Commercial Scuba Diver, 30m Restricted Surface Supply diver, and CAUS Scientific Diver Lv.2. Graeme has an Associate Degree of Arts in Environmental Studies, where he focused on archaeology and physical geography. Graeme lives in British Columbia.

Regulations for a Reason

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I freely admit that it’s been awhile since my last commercial dive. But when I see something like this, I have to say something. Diving is no joke. Commercial and occupational diving even less so. It is not just “doing work in different equipment”, it’s doing work in a hostile environment where you are dependent on your equipment and team to keep you alive, under conditions that can cause severe injury or death if risks are not properly mitigated. It carries more inherent risks and challenges to employers and employees than “regular” employment and labour on the surface. In many…

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NitrOx Fun!

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NitrOx, EANx, DNAx, Safe Air, OEA; many names and acronyms for the same thing, oxygen enriched air. Once maligned, now just largely misunderstood, NitrOx is a part of the modern diving experience for both recreational and commercial divers. This article is less fun than previous entries, but if you’re considering diving NitrOx, it’ll help dispel some of the myths and falsehoods about it for you! NitrOx can be created by several processes, none of which really have much bearing on this article. Suffice to say, no matter which method used, the end result is a breathable gas with a percentage…

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A 3 Step Plan To Getting Back In The Water

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Getting back in the water. Sometimes, life, the universe, and everything conspire to keep you out of the water. It happens. The trick is making sure you get back in the water safely. Some may have noticed that I’ve been pretty light on posts here for the last year or so; that’s because I’m one of those divers right now. So how am I going to get back in the water? I’ve got a 3 Step Plan to get myself back in the game! Step 1: Gear Check My gear has been in the garage for the better part of…

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Why Dive?

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Diving occupies a complex place in modern recreational and competitive sport and as a professional vocation at any level. It also has a complex place in the popular imagination and in popular culture. Non-divers tend to think of one or more of three things when they think about diving and divers; tropical fun dives filled with exotic fish, navy heavy gear divers in Mk.V hats, and the underwater explorations carried out by Jean Cousteau. The idea that a diver could be living next door or up the road never really occurs, and given the relatively low penetration of sport diving…

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Fixing a Waterfall

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It’s not often that you get to say “We fixed a waterfall today at work.” Let’s face it, that’s not within the normal parameters of most occupations. But this summer, that’s exactly what we did! I’ve mentioned before, working as an inshore diver means that you have a lot of different jobs that come up, all with their own challenges, whether it’s lifting a boat off the bottom, or more mundane tasks like pounding bolts in a marina extension. And like most jobs, this one had its own quirks that made it memorable. The job itself was for a housing…

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Which Drysuit Material Should You Choose?

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For cold water divers, a drysuit is the best way to stave off the effects of exposure, especially if you’re on longer bottom times or if like us in BC, the best diving season corresponds with the colder parts of the year. A good drysuit is an investment though, and not something you should jump into casually. The type of diving you do, and the amount you’re able to invest, are the best ways to initially determine which type of drysuit may be best for you. By type, I talking about the material they’re made from. Cosmetic differences, like zipper…

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Supporter Beware!

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We’ve all seen it in the movies. The main character splashes into the water, a cool looking mouthpiece gripped in their teeth, and they proceed to escape, do battle, or otherwise enjoy the benefits of a scuba system without the requisite scuba gear. To say that it’s a dream for divers to be less encumbered when underwater is an understatement. There is a whole minimalist sub-culture in recreational diving, dedicated to minimalizing the amount of gear they need to safely dive. So what’s brought all this on? The Triton Artificial Gill. Back in 2014, I re-posted an online article about…

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