Author Oceana Canada

Oceana Canada seeks to make our oceans as rich, healthy and abundant as they once were. Canada has the world's longest coastline and is responsible for 2.76 million square kilometers of ocean. This real estate makes Canada one of the world’s major fishing nations, catching 1.1 million metric tons of fish each year, or 1.6 per cent of the world’s wild fish catch by weight, and consistently ranking within the top 25 fish-producing countries in the world. But even with these high yields, Canadian fisheries are performing below their full potential. Fortunately, we know how to fix things. Science-based fishery management – which establishes science-based catch limits, reduces bycatch and protects habitat — is helping the oceans rebound and recover where it is established. Oceana Canada campaigns for national policies that rebuild fisheries and return Canada’s formerly vibrant oceans to health; reduce the harvesting of depleted fisheries; and avoid impacts to other species. We also work to protect key habitat for fish to breed and grow to maturity. Our campaigns address increasing fisheries management transparency and paving the way to recovery for Canada’s depleted fish populations.

Exhibition: Gulf of St Lawrence – Log 3. The Martha L. Black

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In the coming weeks, The Scuba News Canada will be featuring videos by Oceana Canada on the exploration of the Gulf of St Lawrence. This weeks feature (Log 3) includes a tour of the Martha L. Black, conducted by Alexandra Cousteau. Throughout the Gulf of St. Lawrence Expedition, Oceana Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada have been living and working aboard the Canadian Coast Guard science vessel Martha L. Black. Follow Alexandra Cousteau for a tour of the vessel and see how scientists live when they are conducting research at sea. This Project was supported partially by a financial contribution from Fisheries…

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New Oceana Canada report finds alarming amounts of seafood fraud in Ottawa

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A report released 29 Novemember 2019 from Oceana Canada, Mystery Fish: Seafood Fraud in Canada and How to Stop It, revealed alarming results of seafood fraud in the nation’s capital. Almost half of the samples tested—45 out of 98—were mislabelled. One third (33) were considered species substitution, since the name on the menu or label did not match the type of fish being sold. Seafood fraud, which is any activity that misrepresents the product being purchased, is a long-standing global problem. An increasing amount of seafood is being shipped to Canada from overseas, with estimates suggesting that up to 80 per…

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Chefs, Seafood Industry Leaders and Oceana Canada Help Combat Seafood Fraud

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Chefs, restaurant owners and sustainable seafood leaders from across the country have added their names to an open letter urging the government take action to stop seafood fraud. By improving boat-to-plate traceability, the government can help ensure that all fish sold in Canada is honestly labelled, legally caught and fully traceable. “Seafood fraud affects our oceans, our wallets and our health, as well as the honest fishers and businesses who play by the rules,” said Josh Laughren, Executive Director of Oceana Canada. “Our government has a responsibility to Canadians to ensure that the path from a boat to our plate…

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Gulf of St. Lawrence Expedition

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Exploring and Protecting Canada’s Oceans. Gulf of St. Lawrence Expedition, August 2017 Oceana Canada, leading scientists and Alexandra Cousteau, Senior Oceana Advisor and granddaughter of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, will set sail to explore never-before-seen parts of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The week-long expedition is the most in-depth visual exploration of the area in Canada’s history. Thanks to advances in oceanographic research and technology, you too can take part and interact with scientists through a 24-hour live stream and daily video and photo updates shared across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The expedition team will collect samples as well as videos and images…

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How is Seafood Caught? A Look at Fishing Gear Types in Canada

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Seafood harvested in Canada are caught by a wide variety of fishing gears. Some gear types are known to be harmful to the health of the ocean because they are non-selective, removing species indiscriminately and damaging habitat. Up to 10.3 million tons of sea life is unintentionally caught each year around the world, captured in nets, lines and other gear.  Bycatch is a destructive and wasteful practice that harms many species including those with threatened and endangered populations like sea birds, sharks, sea turtles, whales and fish. According to our report, Collateral damage: How to reduce bycatch in Canada’s commercial fisheries,…

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Tell the Canadian government to prevent unnecessary harm and waste to sea life

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Up to 10.3 million tonnes of sea life is unintentionally caught each year around the world, captured in nets, lines and other gear. Some of this is kept and sold, or released safely; but far too much is put back in the ocean, either dead or dying. In Canada, this includes endangered and threatened species like whales, turtles, sharks and fish. Unfortunately, the Canadian government isn’t consistently monitoring this threat, nor is it taking necessary action to address it. Help sea life escape the net. Sign the petition and call on Fisheries and Oceans Canada to take immediate action and…

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Is the Canadian Government Missing an Opportunity to Stop Seafood Fraud?

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Whether through following Oceana Canada or recent news stories, chances are you’ve heard about the problem of seafood fraud – the dishonest practice of swapping one type of fish for another species or mislabeling seafood products. Even more likely is that at one point or another, you’ve been the victim of a seafood scam. Let’s put this into perspective: Seafood fraud hurts our health and our wallets Have you ever ordered white tuna at a sushi restaurant? You may have been served escolar, commonly called “the Ex-Lax of fish,” because of the digestive issues it causes. Looking forward to eating…

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Canadian Marine Animals You’ve Likely Never Heard Of

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Many people don’t really know what’s in our oceans. When asked to name a species, we’re likely to mention an adorable marine mammal, such as a whale. Whales are indeed amazing animals, but there are plenty of other species in the ocean that make up a diverse and fascinating ecosystem. Here are just some of the unique species found in Canada’s oceans that you likely haven’t heard of. Lophelia pertusa Lophelia is a cold-water coral that grows throughout the North Atlantic. Coral is made up of many little animals called polyps. Lophelia can be found off the coast of Nova…

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Less Than a Quarter of Canada’s Fish Populations are Considered Healthy

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Canada’s fish populations, and the health of our oceans, are at risk. According to the most comprehensive and up-to-date public analysis ever conducted on the state of Canada’s fish, only 24 per cent of Canada’s fish stocks are considered healthy, and the health of 45 per cent cannot be determined due to a lack of data. This is a serious problem, but there is good news: We can fix this. Watch the video above and then join Oceana Canada to support policies and practices that can make our oceans healthy again. Learn more at: http://www.oceana.ca/en/blog/less-quarter-canadas-fish-populations-are-considered-healthy

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Five Facts about Great White Sharks in Canada

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Earlier this summer a great white shark sighting was reported off the Atlantic coast of Canada. Although these sightings are rare, white sharks do visit Canadian waters, in fact their range extends from sub-arctic to tropical waters. To help boost your shark smarts, we’re counting down five facts about white sharks. 1. The largest confirmed white shark caught in Canada was more than five metres long. It was caught off the coast of PEI in 1983. 2. White shark populations are dangerously low around the world, which is why COSEWIC listed them as an endangered species in Canada. 3.…

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