Red Tails, Blue Water: The Tuskegee Airmen Project

Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +
NOAA
Photo captions from left: Lt. Frank Moody. Photo: Air Force Historical Research Agency; Wayne Lusardi documents the portside wingtip of Lt. Moody’s wrecked aircraft Eric Denson; Tuskegee airmen attending a briefing in Ramitelli, Italy, March 1945. Photo: Library of Congress

During World War II, some of the Tuskegee Airmen—the first African-American fighter pilots for the U.S. Army Air Corps—trained over the Great Lakes. Fifteen Tuskegee Airmen were killed while training in Michigan, and the airplane flown by Lt. Frank H. Moody was recently discovered in Lake Huron. The wreckage is being ​archaeologically documented and recovered by the State of Michigan in partnership with the National Museum of the Tuskegee Airmen in Detroit. In 2021, Diving With a Purpose Maritime Archaeology Program dedicated a memorial in Port Huron to honor the Tuskegee Airmen that perished in the Michigan area. Learn more about this exciting project from Wayne R. Lusardi, State Maritime Archaeologist for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Principle Investigator of the Tuskegee Project and Erik Denson, Board Member/Lead Instructor, Diving With a Purpose Maritime Archaeology Program.

February 8th 2022

The National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series provides educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources, and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. This series currently targets formal and informal educators, students (high school through college), as well as members of the community, including families. You can also visit the archives of the webinar series to catch up on presentations you may have missed here.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. The Webinar ID is 381-572-011. 

Register for this Webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/

Share.

About Author

NOAA is an agency that enriches life through science. Our reach goes from the surface of the sun to the depths of the ocean floor as we work to keep the public informed of the changing environment around them

Leave A Reply