The 2014-2018 Sedna Epic Expedition’s BigFiveDive

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I’m delighted to report that seven of  The 2014-2018 Sedna Epic Expedition’s sea women and two of its advisers, Mary Ellen Gucciardi and Marianne Falardeau, successfully completed the BigFiveDive‬ record attempt on Saturday, July 16.

The BigFiveDive was an incredible team-building exercise, enabling most of Team Sedna’s women to meet for the first time, to dive together and to try out their new SANTI Diving Ladies First drysuits.

What an incredibly busy weekend, just one week before Team Sedna departs for its ocean change expedition to the Arctic…

Imagine staying awake, first of all, for 36 continuous hours…

Then imagine driving, sometimes in the rain, some 1,000 miles between all five of the Great Lakes, traveling between Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York states.

On top of that, imagine diving one shipwreck/historical site in each of the five Great Lakes–and all in 24 hours! The lake waters were surprisingly warm.

Organized by Sedna’s Stephanie Gandulla, a maritime archaeologist, 15 women participated in this grueling record attempt, which we completed just under the wire, in 23 hours…

We chose PADI WomensDiveDay to attempt this world record.

We saw the sun set over Lake Superior, the moon rise over Lake Michigan, the sunrise over Lake Huron, and the sun set over Lake Ontario. We dived Lake Eerie during a sunny afternoon.

Supporters joined us at the dive sites, wishing us well along the way…

Team Sedna heads for Baffin Island in one week’s time, on an ocean change expedition which involves a significant amount of educational outreach to Inuit youths, girls and Elders.

The sea women are still actively fundraising for this expedition, to pay their all-in dive and snorkel costs of $18,000 CAD.

Kindly consider helping me achieve my goal of $12,000 CAD.

Learn more and consider supporting Susan’s dive and snorkel costs for the Sedna Epic’s ocean change expedition to Baffin Island, July 25-August 4″ at https://www.gofundme.com/susanreaton

Learn more at: http://www.sednaepic.com

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Ten years ago, I suffered a serious scuba diving trauma that landed me in a hyperbaric chamber for three days, ending my 30-year diving career. Undaunted, my up-close-and-personal relationship with the ocean—which had included teaching scuba diving—didn’t end in the hyperbaric chamber… Today, I explore the world’s oceans—from Antarctica to the Arctic—in the snorkel zone, a dynamic land-sea-ice-air interface where charismatic animals interact with snorkelers. I've snorkeled with chatty belugas Hudson Bay, migrating salmon in Haida Gwaii, and with charging 1,400-pound leopard seals in Antarctica. During a snorkel expedition to witness the annual narwhal migration through the Northwest Passage, my co-explorers and I became trapped on a floating ice island, precipitating a 36-hour military air rescue off the northern coast of Baffin Island. In the past five years, I've participated in two science-based expeditions to the Arctic and three science-based expeditions to the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and Antarctica. Readers followed me virtually, at the Bottom of the World, as I studied the interplay of plate tectonics, glaciers, ocean change, climate and life. In 2015, I was was named one of Canada’s top 100 modern-day explorers by the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. In 2016, I was named one of Canada's top female explorers, also by the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. A member of the Explorers Club, I was named to the Explorers Club's (Canadian Chapter) 2014 and 2015 Honour Rolls. An advocate of protecting Canada's wild spaces and the animals who call them home, I sit on the board of directors of Nature Canada.

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